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dc.contributor.advisorGillett-Karam, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorPryor Jr, Herman I
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Studies, Leadership, and Policy
dc.contributor.programEd.D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T17:15:16Z
dc.date.available2018-10-25T17:15:16Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.description.abstractThis quantitative study employed a correlational design to examine the relationship between socio-ecological factors and academic success experienced by African American men who participate in African American male-based achievement programs at five Maryland community colleges. The Socio-Ecological Outcomes (SEO) model developed by Harris and Wood (2014b) was used as the theoretical framework to explain the success outcomes for African American men, capturing interactions among domains within the Community College Survey of Men (CCSM©). For this research, three of the four domains (non-cognitive, academic, and campus ethos) within the CCSM© were examined and 13 subscales found across the domains (self-efficacy, action control, degree utility, help seeking, breadwinner, racial affinity, student-faculty interaction, academic service use, sense of belonging, perceptions of care, connectivity, validation, and social integration) were examined as independent variables. Academic success was measured using participants’ self-reported current college GPA as dependent variable. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (correlation and multinomial logistic regression analyses) were used to determine relationships between variables and their impact on academic success. Help-seeking, breadwinner, and validation were omitted because of low reliability yields. Several major findings were highlighted in this study. A weak but significantly positive correlation was found between action control and GPA. Multinomial logistic regression also revealed that action control was a significant predictor of African American students having a GPA of 3.5 to 4.0 versus those with a GPA of 2.5 to 2.9. Although correlations were found between the four factors within the campus domain, a multinomial logistic regression conducted revealed that social integration, perception of care, and connectivity were statistically significant predictors of GPA. This study has contributed to the body of literature regarding the success of African American men attending Maryland community colleges.
dc.genredissertations
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2CC0TX78
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/11719
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMorgan State University
dc.rightsThis item is made available by Morgan State University for personal, educational, and research purposes in accordance with Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Other uses may require permission from the copyright owner.
dc.subjectAfrican American Men and Community Colleges
dc.subjectAfrican American Male-based Achievement Programs
dc.subjectCommunity College Survey of Men
dc.subjectEducational leadership
dc.subjectInstitutional Support African American Men in Higher Education
dc.subjectCommunity college education
dc.subjectAcademic Success of African American Men
dc.subjectHigher education administration
dc.subjectSuccess Factors for African American Men
dc.titleAcademic Success of African American Men in African American Male-Based Achievement Programs at Five Maryland Community Colleges
dc.typeText


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