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dc.contributor.advisorHam, Debra N.
dc.contributor.advisorPeskin, Lawrence
dc.contributor.advisorBerliner, Brett
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Damita
dc.contributor.departmentHistory and Geographyen_US
dc.contributor.programMaster of Artsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-27T00:15:45Z
dc.date.available2020-03-27T00:15:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-25
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines African American women landowners in Clarendon County, South Carolina to understand women's economic agency, self-sufficiency, and independence. Ownership of property, especially land, has been the goal of Americans since the before the founding of the United States. The story of black landownership in the South as currently told, however, largely excludes rural female landowners, particularly those who were not free prior to emancipation, or who were married and purchased land singularly. Using rural African American women in Clarendon County, as examples, this paper will look at the reasons for African American women’s longing for land ownership, the impact of property laws on women, the means through which they obtained the land, and the ways in which they retained and protected the land for their descendants.en_US
dc.genrethesesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2ubwh-5zvg
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/17685
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American studiesen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectWomen's studiesen_US
dc.title"Occupation: Land Owner": African American Female Property Ownership in Clarendon County, South Carolina, 1870-1910en_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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