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dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Emily M.
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Danielle Weiss
dc.contributor.authorDahlquist, Lynnda M.
dc.contributor.authorHahn, Amy L.
dc.contributor.authorBollinger, Mary Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T20:14:52Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T20:14:52Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-31
dc.description.abstractThis study explored factors that influence the accuracy of caregivers’ appraisals of the foods their children with food allergy should avoid. Seventy-two caregivers of children with food allergy completed measures of caregiver educational attainment, food allergy knowledge, food allergy worry, and a questionnaire assessing whether or not their child should avoid specific foods (the Foods to Avoid Test). Unnecessary avoidance was indicated when a caregiver reported their child should avoid a food item, even though that item was safe for their child based on their food allergy (i.e., false positive). Lack of appropriate avoidance was represented by caregivers reporting a food did not need to be avoided when it should be avoided based on the child’s food allergy (i.e., false negative). Caregivers with lower educational attainment and less food allergy knowledge and whose children were more recently diagnosed had more false-negative appraisal errors. In contrast, false-positive appraisal errors were most strongly related to parental worry about food allergy. The findings suggest that screening for food allergy general knowledge and food avoidance appraisals may help identify gaps in caregivers’ knowledge and ultimately prevent accidental exposures and/or unnecessary avoidance.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded, in part, by the UMBC Graduate Student Association. The Food Allergy Knowledge Test is available from Amy Hahn at amy.hahn@nationwidechildrens.org. The authors thank the following graduate students for their support: Wendy Pinder, Caitlin Thompson, Emily Foxen-Craft, and Julia Zeroth. The authors also thank the following research assistants who aided in data collection: Sydney Baker, Natasha Barlow, Jacqueline Douglas, Shashanna Eaton, Nour Al Ghriwati, Lauren Goodwin, Valerie Koury, Nicole Magin, and Abigail Matthews. This work was supported by the UMBC Graduate Student Association.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02739615.2020.1805746?journalCode=hchc20en_US
dc.format.extent30 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles postprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2p8ge-ytr5
dc.identifier.citationEmily M. Steiner, Danielle Weiss Byrne, Lynnda M. Dahlquist, Amy L. Hahn & Mary Elizabeth Bollinger (2020) Which foods should a child with food allergy avoid? The role of parental knowledge in food avoidance appraisals, Children's Health Care, DOI: 10.1080/02739615.2020.1805746en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2020.1805746
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/19997
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Psychology Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Children's Health Care on 31 Aug 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02739615.2020.1805746.
dc.titleWhich foods should a child with food allergy avoid? The role of parental knowledge in food avoidance appraisalsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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