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dc.contributor.authorLemons, Kayla
dc.contributor.authorFu, Ziying
dc.contributor.authorAoudé, Imad
dc.contributor.authorOgura, Tatsuya
dc.contributor.authorSun, Julianna
dc.contributor.authorChang, Justin
dc.contributor.authorMbonu, Kenechukwu
dc.contributor.authorMatsumoto, Ichiro
dc.contributor.authorArakawa, Hiroyuki
dc.contributor.authorLin, Weihong
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-22T19:01:30Z
dc.date.available2021-02-22T19:01:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-05
dc.description.abstractThe mammalian main olfactory epithelium (MOE) modifies its activities in response to changes in the chemical environment. This process is essential for maintaining the functions of the olfactory system and the upper airway. However, mechanisms involved in this functional maintenance, especially those occurring via paracrine regulatory pathways within the multicellular MOE, are poorly understood. Previously, a population of non-neuronal, transient receptor potential M5-expressing microvillous cells (TRPM5-MCs) was identified in the MOE, and the initial characterization of these cells showed that they are cholinergic and responsive to various xenobiotics including odorants at high concentrations. Here, we investigated the role of TRPM5-MCs in maintaining olfactory function using transcription factor Skn-1a knockout (Skn-1a-/-) mice, which lack TRPM5-MCs in the MOE. Under our standard housing conditions, Skn-1a-/- mice do not differ significantly from control mice in odor-evoked electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses and olfactory-guided behaviors, including finding buried food and preference reactions to socially and sexually relevant odors. However, after a 2-wk exposure to high-concentration odor chemicals and chitin powder, Skn-1a-/- mice exhibited a significant reduction in their odor and pheromone-evoked EOG responses. Consequently, their olfactory-guided behaviors were impaired compared with vehicle-exposed Skn-1a-/- mice. Conversely, the chemical exposure did not induce significant changes in the EOG responses and olfactory behaviors of control mice. Therefore, our physiological and behavioral results indicate that TRPM5-MCs play a protective role in maintaining the olfactory function of the MOE.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Tim Ford and Wangmei Luo for technical assistance and Kritika Chugh and Abdullah AlMatrouk for proofreading.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.eneuro.org/content/4/3/ENEURO.0135-17.2017en_US
dc.format.extent16 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2ot4f-zwxp
dc.identifier.citationKayla Lemons, Ziying Fu et al., Lack of TRPM5-Expressing Microvillous Cells in Mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium Leads to Impaired Odor-Evoked Responses and Olfactory-Guided Behavior in a Challenging Chemical Environment, eNeuro (2017), 4 (3) ENEURO.0135-17.2017; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0135-17.2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0135-17.2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/21060
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Biological Sciences Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleLack of TRPM5-Expressing Microvillous Cells in Mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium Leads to Impaired Odor-Evoked Responses and Olfactory-Guided Behavior in a Challenging Chemical Environmenten_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
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