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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T19:35:02Z
dc.date.available2021-06-10T19:35:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-05
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I use historical patent data and natural experiments to show how policies and institutions affect invention. Chapter 1 shows that establishing new colleges causes 33% more patents per year in places that get a college, but few of these additional patents come from the college's graduates. Chapter 2 uses alcohol prohibition to show that informal social interactions are important for invention: shuttering saloons decreased patenting by 15%. The effect is strongest immediately after prohibition begins. Chapter 3 plots demographic trends of inventors; blacks and females are persistently underrepresented. Chapter 4 describes several historical patent datasets in detail.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3081168en_US
dc.format.extent9 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles preprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2o2kn-sxjb
dc.identifier.citationAndrews, Michael; Dissertation Executive Summary: Fuel of Interest and Fire of Genius: Essays on the Economic History of Innovation; https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3081168en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/21719
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Economics Department Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.titleDissertation Executive Summary: Fuel of Interest and Fire of Genius: Essays on the Economic History of Innovationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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