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dc.contributor.advisorCallahan, John J.
dc.contributor.authorPoynton, Aaron Sean
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Baltimore. Yale Gordon College of Public Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.programUniversity of Baltimore. Doctor of Public Administrationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-19T14:58:52Z
dc.date.available2016-12-19T14:58:52Z
dc.date.issued2010-03
dc.descriptionD.P.A. -- University of Baltimore, 2010
dc.descriptionDissertation submitted to the Yale Gordon College of Public Affairs at the University of Baltimore in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Public Administration.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States of America was created around the concept of federalism, which embraces the principles of shared governance and balance of power between the sovereign states and the supreme national government. Due to distinctive constitutional, legal, organizational, and historical reasons, the U.S. National Guard operates as a dual-purpose force within this system of federal government. As a result, the Guard has separate state and federal missions and separate and independent command and control authorities. This study is exploratory in nature and its primary purpose is to understand how federalism affects the National Guard's domestic emergency response mission and to relate the findings to practice. The study follows a mixed methods concurrent nested strategy with a qualitative predominance. Qualitative data was collected through personal interviews, observation, and documented literature. Quantitative data was collected through an online survey administered to the fifty-four offices of the adjutant generals. The data was simultaneously analyzed to answer the primary research question and four related secondary questions. Variables were identified and a framework was created. The findings indicate that increasingly strong federal influences have affected nearly every aspect of the National Guard's existence. The two independent variables of state government influences and federal government influence affect the dependent variable, the National Guard's emergency response mission, through a series of moderator variables: mission and funding, organization and structure, personnel and equipment, and planning and training. Additionally, related secondary research questions on the topics of emergency management assistance compacts, organizational and structural alternatives, command and control structures, and State Defense Forces were examined. This exploratory study lays the foundation for future research.en_US
dc.format.extentxxi, 547 leavesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.genredissertationsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2KC13
dc.identifier.otherPoynton_baltimore_0942A_10003
dc.identifier.otherUB_2010_Poynton_A
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/3697
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis item may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. It is made available by the University of Baltimore for non-commercial research and educational purposes.en_US
dc.subjectemergency managementen_US
dc.subjectfederalismen_US
dc.subjectHomeland Defenseen_US
dc.subjectHomeland Securityen_US
dc.subjectNational Guarden_US
dc.subjectnational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshEmergency Management Assistance Compact (U.S.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEmergency managementen_US
dc.subject.lcshDisaster reliefen_US
dc.subject.lcshInteragency coordinationen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States. National Guard.en_US
dc.titleThe Duel Over Duality: Effects of Federalism on the United States National Guard's Emergency Response Missionen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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