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dc.contributor.advisorFarley, Sally
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Charles
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Santokh
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Taylor
dc.contributor.authorFarley, Sally
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Applied Behavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.programPsychologyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-06T22:57:22Z
dc.date.available2017-03-06T22:57:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.descriptionThis poster was presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association in Boston, MA.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research tested the effectiveness of the evoking freedom technique in two field experiments. Participants were asked to either complete a survey (Experiment 1) or to allow a stranger to borrow their mobile phone to make a call (Experiment 2). Half of the requests involved language that evoked freedom (“feel free to say no”). In both experiments, results showed significantly greater compliance in the “feel free to say no” condition.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEastern Psychological Associationen_US
dc.format.extent1 pageen_US
dc.genrepostersen_US
dc.genrepresentations (communicative events)en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2GG2K
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/3842
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectsocial influence tacticsen_US
dc.subjectevoking freedomen_US
dc.subjectfield experimenten_US
dc.subjectcomplianceen_US
dc.title"Free to Say No": Evoking Freedom Increased Compliance in Two Field Experimentsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States