Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKassner, Joshua J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T16:31:58Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T16:31:58Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-13
dc.description.abstractOver 100 days in the late spring and early summer of 1994, approximately 800,000 Rwandan Tutsis and Tutsi-sympathizers were slaughtered in a campaign of violence orchestrated by Rwanda’s Hutu leaders in concert with a Hutu militia known as the Interahamwe. While the Hutu-extremists engaged in genocide, the international community stood idly by, hiding behind the moral cover of false histories, legal technicalities, and disingenuous claims that the choice not to intervene was a matter of respect for Rwandan sovereignty. Only after the Rwanda Patriotic Front had stopped the killing and defeated the extremist forces did France, under the guise of humanitarian concern, intervene. In reality, the French established a safe zone to protect their client – the Hutu-led Francophone genocidal government fleeing the country in defeat.[i]en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.thecritique.com/articles/transitional-justice-rwanda/en_US
dc.format.extent21 pagesen_US
dc.genreInternet articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2707WQ2M
dc.identifier.citationKassner, J. (September 2016). Transitional Justice & Rwanda: David Hume And The Limits Of Jus Post Bellum. The Critique, 1-21.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/7442
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Critiqueen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectRwandan Genocideen_US
dc.subjectpolitical strifeen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectpolitical scienceen_US
dc.subjecthumanitarian crisisen_US
dc.subjectjusticeen_US
dc.subjectgovernment oppressionen_US
dc.titleTransitional Justice & Rwanda: David Hume And The Limits of Jus Post Bellumen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record