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dc.contributor.authorStrow, L. Larrabee
dc.contributor.authorHannon, Scott E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-26T15:37:58Z
dc.date.available2018-10-26T15:37:58Z
dc.date.issued2008-09-20
dc.description.abstractA 4‐year zonally averaged climatology of atmospheric CO₂, ocean only, between ±60° latitude has been derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances. Using only very clear fields of view, the CO₂ profile in the computed radiances is scaled until agreement is found with observations. ECMWF forecast and analysis fields are used for the temperature profile in the computed radiances. The AIRS channels used to derive CO₂ amounts are nominally sensitive to CO₂ variability in the ∼300–800 mbar region (2–9 km), significantly lower in the atmosphere than that in previous studies using AIRS. Validation using aircraft measurements of CO₂ at 650 mbar indicates that the AIRS CO₂ results presented here are accurate to the 0.5–1.0 ppm level. The AIRS‐derived climatology clearly exhibits the CO₂ rectifier effect, with mean CO₂ values several parts per million lower than in those in the boundary layer. The AIRS CO₂ seasonal cycle has a relatively constant amplitude of ∼3 ppm from +10° to +60° latitude, which matches the boundary layer seasonal cycle amplitude near +10° latitude but is about three times smaller than that in the boundary layer amplitude at +60° latitude. Phase comparisons between the AIRS and boundary layer CO₂ seasonal cycles show the boundary layer phase leading AIRS in the Northern Hemisphere until ∼+10° latitude, where the phases cross and the AIRS higher‐altitude CO₂ begins to lead the boundary layer phase down to ∼−10° latitude. These results may offer new insight into CO₂ interhemispherical transport. Growth rates derived from the AIRS CO₂ climatology are 2.21 ± 0.24 ppm/year, in good agreement with in situ measurements.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by NASA Headquarters under grant NNG04GG03G. We would also like acknowledge the efforts of those who made the AIRS instrument possible, especially Moustafa Chahine, Ramesh Kakar, Fred O’Callahan, George Aumann, Tom Pagano, and the BAE team that designed and built AIRS. We also thank Howard Motteler and Sergio De-Souza Machado at UMBC for their contributions to this work.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007JD009713en_US
dc.format.extent20 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articleen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M23R0PX7X
dc.identifier.citationStrow, L. L., and S. E. Hannon (2008), A 4-year zonal climatology of lower tropospheric CO₂ derived from ocean-only Atmospheric Infrared Sounder observations, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D18302, doi:10.1029/2007JD009713.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2007JD009713
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/11752
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Physics Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rights©2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.subjectclimatologyen_US
dc.subjecttropospheric CO₂en_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)en_US
dc.subjectHigh Performance Computing Facility (HPCF)en_US
dc.subjectECMWF forecasten_US
dc.titleA 4‐year zonal climatology of lower tropospheric CO₂ derived from ocean‐only Atmospheric Infrared Sounder observationsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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