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dc.contributor.authorLemanski, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorLandman, Karina
dc.contributor.authorDurington, Matthew Slover
dc.contributor.departmentTowson University, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T15:30:11Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T15:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.description.abstractThe last 20 years has witnessed an explosion not only in the growth of private residential territories throughout the world, but also in the literature addressing them. The majority of research is centred on experiences in the United States and Latin America (although studies elsewhere are increasing) and suffers from a tendency to homogenise the processes and consequences of gating as synonymous whether experienced in Los Angeles, New York, Mexico City or São Paulo. Whilst axiomatic to state the unlikelihood of identical trends in such differing contexts, the absence of such a statement in the literature is significant. This paper addresses the social and spatial phenomenon of residential gated communities in three of South Africa’s major cities: Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town. Detailed background and discussion regarding the development and experience of ‘gating’ in each city is analysed, emphasising the uniqueness of each city’s gating experience. These indications, that gating is not a universal experience despite some common themes, serve to counter the homogenous discourse in both popular and academic parlance throughout the world and within South Africa. In addition, particular concerns related to the growth of residential forms based on exclusion and privatisation within the South African context, are considered. In essence, we conclude that while ‘gating’ may be an individually rational decision in the context of South Africa’s growing crime, its collective consequences produce a divided city, at odds with post-apartheid ideals of unity and equality.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.format.extent27 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2FT8DP2W
dc.identifier.citationLemanski C, Landman K, Durington M. Divergent and Similar Experiences of ‘Gating’ in South Africa: Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town. Urban Forum. 2008;19(2):133-158. doi:10.1007/s12132-008-9030-0.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1015-3802
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12132-008-9030-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/11783
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtTowson University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUrban Forum, volume 19, issue 2
dc.subjectJohannesburgen_US
dc.subjectDurbanen_US
dc.subjectCape Townen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectNeighborhoodsen_US
dc.subjectSocial problemsen_US
dc.subjectCrimeen_US
dc.subjectPrivatizationen_US
dc.subjectGated communitiesen_US
dc.subjectPrivate residential territoriesen_US
dc.titleDivergent and similar experiences of 'gating' in South Africa: Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Townen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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