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dc.contributor.authorAndreoni, Igor
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Sara
dc.contributor.authorRest, Armin
dc.contributor.authorPritchard, Tyler A.
dc.contributor.authorCaleb, Manisha
dc.contributor.authorChang, Seo-Won
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Wael
dc.contributor.authorLien, Amy
dc.contributor.authorMöller, Anais
dc.contributor.authorRavasio, Maria Edvige
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Timothy M. C.
dc.contributor.authorBhandari, Shivani
dc.contributor.authorCucchiara, Antonino
dc.contributor.authorM. Flynn, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorJankowski, Fabian
dc.contributor.authorKeane, Evan F.
dc.contributor.authorMoriya, Takashi J.
dc.contributor.authorOnken, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorParthasarathy, Aditya
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Daniel C.
dc.contributor.authorPetroff, Emily
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-26T19:05:25Z
dc.date.available2019-04-26T19:05:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-26
dc.description.abstractSearches for optical transients are usually performed with a cadence of days to weeks, optimised for supernova discovery. The optical fast transient sky is still largely unexplored, with only a few surveys to date having placed meaningful constraints on the detection of extragalactic transients evolving at sub-hour timescales. Here, we present the results of deep searches for dim, minute-timescale extragalactic fast transients using the Dark Energy Camera, a core facility of our all-wavelength and all-messenger Deeper, Wider, Faster programme. We used continuous 20 s exposures to systematically probe timescales down to 1.17 minutes at magnitude limits g > 23 (AB), detecting hundreds of transient and variable sources. Nine candidates passed our strict criteria on duration and non-stellarity, 5 of which could later be classified as flare stars, but 4 of which have more unsure classification. Searches for fast radio burst and gamma-ray counterparts during simultaneous multi-facility observations yielded no counterparts to those 4 optical transients. Also, no long-term variability was detected with pre-imaging and follow-up observations using the SkyMapper optical telescope. We place (conservative) upper limits and (optimistic) measurements of minute-timescale fast optical transient rates for a range of depths and timescales. Finally, we demonstrate that optical g-band light curve behaviour alone cannot discriminate between confirmed extragalactic fast transients such as prompt GRB flashes and Galactic stellar flares.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch support to IA is also provided by the GROWTH project, funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant No 1545949. GROWTH is a collaborative project between California Institute of Technology (USA), Pomona College (USA), San Diego State University (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), University of Maryland College Park (USA), University of Wisconsin Milwaukee (USA), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan), National Central University (Taiwan), Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India), Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India), Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel), The Oskar Klein Centre at Stockholm University (Sweden), Humboldt University (Germany). JC acknowledges the Australian Research Council Future Fellowship grant FT130101219. This work has made use of data from the European Space Agency (ESA) mission Gaia (https://www.cosmos.esa. int/gaia), processed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC, https://www.cosmos.esa. int/web/gaia/dpac/consortium). Funding for the DPAC has been provided by national institutions, in particular the institutions participating in the Gaia Multilateral Agreement. The national facility capability for SkyMapper has been funded through ARC LIEF grant LE130100104 from the Australian Research Council, awarded to the University of Sydney, the Australian National University, Swinburne University of Technology, the University of Queensland, the University of Western Australia, the University of Melbourne, Curtin University of Technology, Monash University and the Australian Astronomical Observatory. SkyMapper is owned and operated by The Australian National University's Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics. This project used data obtained with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), which was constructed by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration. Funding for the DES Projects has been provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Ministry of Science and Education of Spain, the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, the Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics at the Ohio State University, the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University, Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos, Funda c~ao Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cient co e Tecnol ogico and the Minist erio da Ci^encia, Tecnologia e Inovac~ao, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Collaborating Institutions in the Dark Energy Survey. The Collaborating Institutions are Argonne National Laboratory, the University of California at Santa Cruz, the University of Cambridge, Centro de Investigaciones En ergeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol ogicas-Madrid, the University of Chicago, University College London, the DES-Brazil Consortium, the University of Edinburgh, the Eidgen ossische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Z urich, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Institut de Ci encies de l'Espai (IEEC/CSIC), the Institut de F sica d'Altes Energies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Ludwig-Maximilians Universit at M unchen and the associated Excellence Cluster Universe, the University of Michigan, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, the University of Nottingham, the Ohio State University, the OzDES Membership Consortium the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Portsmouth, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, the University of Sussex, and Texas A&M University. Based on observations at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://arxiv.org/abs/1903.11083en_US
dc.format.extent20 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles preprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2deaa-x8vc
dc.identifier.citationIgor Andreoni, et.al, Probing the extragalactic fast transient sky at minute timescales with DECam, Astrophysics, High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena, 2019, https://arxiv.org/abs/1903.11083en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/13518
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Physics Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.subjectsupernovaeen_US
dc.subjectgeneral - starsen_US
dc.subjectflare - gamma-ray bursten_US
dc.subjectgeneral - radio continuumen_US
dc.subjecttransientsen_US
dc.titleProbing the extragalactic fast transient sky at minute timescales with DECamen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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