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dc.contributor.authorSamuel, Laura J.
dc.contributor.authorSzanton, Sarah L.
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorWolff, Jennifer L.
dc.contributor.authorOng, Pinchuan
dc.contributor.authorZielinskie, Ginger
dc.contributor.authorBetley, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-11T17:58:19Z
dc.date.available2019-06-11T17:58:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-01
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to examine whether Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and benefit levels are associated with reduced subsequent hospital and emergency department utilization in low-income older adults. Study participants were 68,956 Maryland residents aged ≥65 years who were dually enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid (2009–2012). Annual inpatient hospital days and costs and emergency department visits were modeled as a function of either 1-year lagged SNAP participation or lagged SNAP benefit amounts, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, autoregressive effects, year, health status, and Medicaid participation. SNAP participation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.93, 0.99), and, among participants, each $10 increase in monthly benefits (aOR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.99–0.99) are associated with a reduced likelihood of hospitalization, but not emergency department use. The authors estimate that enrolling the 47% of the 2012 population who were eligible nonparticipants in SNAP could have been associated with $19 million in hospital cost savings. Accounting for the strong effects of health care access, this study finds that SNAP is associated with reduced hospitalization in dually eligible older adults. Policies to increase SNAP participation and benefit amounts in eligible older adults may reduce hospitalizations and health care costs for older dual eligible adults living in the community.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/pop.2017.0055en_US
dc.format.extent9 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2yxav-p10q
dc.identifier.citationLaura J. Samuel, Sarah L. Szanton, Rachel Cahill, Jennifer L. Wolff, Pinchuan Ong, Ginger Zielinskie, and Charles Betley.Population Health Management.Apr 2018.ahead of printhttp://doi.org/10.1089/pop.2017.0055en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1089/pop.2017.0055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/14048
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofOther Hilltop Institute (UMBC) Works
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectfood assistanceen_US
dc.subjecthealth care utilizationen_US
dc.subjecthospitalizationen_US
dc.subjectolder adultsen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic statusen_US
dc.titleDoes the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Affect Hospital Utilization Among Older Adults? The Case of Marylanden_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.