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dc.contributor.authorMills, Lindsey
dc.contributor.programBachelor's Degreeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-13T21:02:11Z
dc.date.available2019-06-13T21:02:11Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.description.abstractApproximately 133 million Americans live with a chronic illness (“The Power of Prevention”). Government funding through the National Institutes of Health and other programs are an important source of research funding for the doctors and scientists who study and treat these diseases and syndromes. I am one of those Americans and live with a disease that very few doctors specialize in and for which few treatments options exist, at least in part because of lack of funding. This experience led me to ask what lobbying strategies are effective specifically for interest groups that represent a single disease. Lobbying strategies are well studied, but less research has been done to examine the strategies used by interest groups representing smaller and very specific constituencies, such as those affected by a single disease. In “The Political is Personal: Examining the Role of Personal Connection to a Disease as an Access Point for Single-disease Interest Groups” I suggest that if a single-disease interest group can find an elected representatives with a personal connection to the disease in question the interest groups will be able to gain greater access and accomplish more of its agenda. My question arose because of my frustration with the lack of NIH funding for the disease ME/CFS. However, while the question was informed by personal experience, academic distance allowed me to study the question in a useful manner. This examination led to an internship with MEAction in the spring of 2012. Writing the paper and completing the internship both underscored for me how important it is that patients and their families and friends speak up for government medical research funding.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://blogs.goucher.edu/verge/the-political-is-personal-examining-the-role-of-personal-connection-to-a-disease-as-an-access-point-for-singledisease-interest-groups/en_US
dc.format.extent29 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2pi7n-ygds
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/14220
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtGoucher College, Baltimore, MD
dc.relation.ispartofseriesverge: the goucher journal of undergraduate writing;15
dc.rightsCollection may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.
dc.subject.lcshResearch -- Periodicals.
dc.titleThe Political is Personal: Examining the Role of Personal Connection to a Disease as an Access Point for Singledisease Interest Groupsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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