Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCollins, Samuel Gerald
dc.contributor.authorDurington, Matthew Slover
dc.contributor.authorFabricant, Nicole
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-18T16:28:00Z
dc.date.available2019-06-18T16:28:00Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-17
dc.description.abstractOne year ago, Baltimore citizens took to the streets to protest not only the death of Freddie Grey, but the structural inequalities and structural violence that systematically limit the opportunities for working-class African Americans in Baltimore. The protests, though, were not just confined to Baltimore City. Borne on sophisticated understandings of intersectionality and political economy, the moral imperatives from the Baltimore Uprising resonated with students at our university in Baltimore County, where campus activists moved to both support the people of Baltimore while using the moment of critical reflection to critique racial inequalities on campus. Since students were displaying a holistic, anthropological understanding of race and inequality in Baltimore, we decided to structure our classes accordingly and brought together several courses in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice in order to examine the interrelationships between power, race, class, public space and urban development. We taught common texts, visited each other's classes, and planned events that brought students together with community leaders in Baltimore to discuss common concerns and to learn from each other. This paper reports on that experiment and suggests that a pedagogical model premised on drawing thematic linkages between existing courses is one way to address current events that impact us all while allowing students to direct the course of their own education.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/muj/article/view/21511en_US
dc.format.extent12 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2qdtf-wsnq
dc.identifier.citationCollins, S. G., Durington, M., & Fabricant, N. (2017). Teaching Baltimore together: Building thematic cooperation between classes. Metropolitan Universities, 28(2), 90–102. doi: https://doi.org/10.18060/21511en_US
dc.identifier.issn1047-8485
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.18060/21511
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/14260
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCoalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universitiesen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtTowson University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMetropolitan Universities Journal;volume 28, number 2
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectBaltimore Uprising (2015)en_US
dc.subjectCommunity activismen_US
dc.subjectCampus activismen_US
dc.subjectUrban anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectRace discriminationen_US
dc.subjectCommunity engagement in higher educationen_US
dc.titleTeaching Baltimore Together: Building Thematic Cooperation Between Classesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 3.0 United States