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dc.contributor.advisorMoonsammy, Rita
dc.contributor.advisorGeleta, Amsalu
dc.contributor.advisorKymaani, Roxanne
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter-Gonia, Colleen
dc.contributor.programMA in Cultural Sustainabilityen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-25T15:08:13Z
dc.date.available2019-06-25T15:08:13Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.description.abstractThe research presented in this thesis addresses the complexities of identity and systems by narrating different pieces of both and how they are at play in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. This narration offers a look at how leadership identity is formed, articulated, and performed, and inquires about the thrive-ability of the ELCA based on its current identity performance through Theological Education and the Rostering System. This research pulls from auto-ethnography, identity scholars, Lutheran theology, and interview analysis to address the following question: If the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America looked into the "mirror of the cross," would the institution need to change? This question is rooted in generating a collective sense of self-awareness and begins to address tensions between identity construction and identity performance by asking what the institution sees in the mirror and wondering if that is the image it wants to see, and even if that is a projection of HOW the institution is becoming and wants to exist in the future? Using an overarching theoretical framework of Sinek’s Golden Circle and Complex Systems Theory, this research offers language to the complexities of identity, identity construction, and identity performance in relation to Emergent-Self Organization in an effort to understand the relational web which brings together individuals, communities, and institutions for, and in, the process of identity construction and performance.en_US
dc.format.extent179 pagesen_US
dc.genrecapstonesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m29bhy-4j5e
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/14300
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtGoucher College, Baltimore, MD
dc.rightsThis work may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectTheologyen_US
dc.subjectLutheranen_US
dc.subjectEvangelical Lutheran Church in Americaen_US
dc.subjectSystems Theoryen_US
dc.subjectTheological Educationen_US
dc.subjectRostering Systemen_US
dc.subjectEmergent, Self-Organizationen_US
dc.subjectTheology of the Crossen_US
dc.subject.lcshCultural sustainability -- Capstone (Graduate)
dc.titleOrganizational Identity: How Theology, Cultural Sustainability and Systems Theory Inform Institutional Thrive-abilityen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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This work may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.