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dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, R.
dc.contributor.authorHalpern, J. P.
dc.contributor.authorGotthelf, E. V.
dc.contributor.authorEracleous, M.
dc.contributor.authorMirabal, N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-09T16:00:07Z
dc.date.available2020-09-09T16:00:07Z
dc.date.issued2003-02-05
dc.description.abstractWe have made a multiwavelength study of the overlapping error boxes of the unidentified γ-ray sources TeV J2032+4130 and 3EG J2033+4118 in the direction of the Cygnus OB2 association (d = 1.7 kpc) in order to search for a point-source counterpart of the first unidentified TeV source. Optical identifications and spectroscopic classifications for the brighter X-ray sources in ROSAT PSPC and Chandra ACIS images are obtained, without finding a compelling counterpart. The classified X-ray sources are a mix of early- and late-type stars, with one exception. The brightest source in the Chandra observation is a new, hard absorbed source that is both transient and rapidly variable. It lies 7' from the centroid of the TeV emission, which places it outside of the claimed 2 σ location (r ≈ 4farcm8). A possible eclipse or "dip" transition is seen in its light curve. With a peak 1-10 keV luminosity of ≈7 × 10³²(d/1.7 kpc)2 ergs s⁻¹, this source could be a quiescent low-mass X-ray binary that lies beyond the Cyg OB2 association. A coincident, reddened optical object of R = 20.4, J = 15.4, H = 14.2, and K = 13.4 is observed but not yet classified as a result of the lack of obvious emission or absorption features in its spectrum. Alternatively, this Chandra and optical source might be a considered a candidate for a "proton blazar," a long hypothesized type of radio-weak γ-ray source. More detailed observations will be needed to determine the nature of this variable X-ray source and to assess the possibility of its connection with TeV J2032+4130.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR. M. acknowledges support from NSF grant PHY-9983836. E.V.G. is supported by NASA LTSA grant NAG 5-7935. Chandra studies of unidentified γ-ray sources is supported by SAO grants GO2-3071X and GO2-3082X to J.P.H.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/377471en_US
dc.format.extent24 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles preprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2lwuc-y7c0
dc.identifier.citationR. Mukherjee et al., Search for a Point-Source Counterpart of the Unidentified Gamma-Ray Source TeV J2032+4130 in Cygnus, ApJ 589 487 (2003), doi: https://doi.org/10.1086/374641en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1086/374641
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/19614
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIOPen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Physics Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Center for Space Sciences and Technology (CSST) / Center for Research and Exploration in Space Sciences & Technology II (CRSST II)
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rights© 2003. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.titleSearch for a Point-Source Counterpart of the Unidentified Gamma-Ray Source TeV J2032+4130 in Cygnusen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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