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dc.contributor.authorMarais, E. A.
dc.contributor.authorJacob, D. J.
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, J. L.
dc.contributor.authorCampuzano-Jost, P.
dc.contributor.authorDay, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorHu, W.
dc.contributor.authorKrechmer, J.
dc.contributor.authorZhu, L.
dc.contributor.authorKim, P.S.
dc.contributor.authorMiller, C. C.
dc.contributor.authorFisher, J. A.
dc.contributor.authorTravis, K.
dc.contributor.authorYu, K.
dc.contributor.authorHanisco, T. F.
dc.contributor.authorWolfe, G. M.
dc.contributor.authorArkinson, H. L.
dc.contributor.authorPye, H. O. T.
dc.contributor.authorFroyd, K. D.
dc.contributor.authorLiao, J.
dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, V. F.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T16:58:15Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T16:58:15Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-11
dc.description.abstractIsoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC⁴RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOₓ ≡  NO + NO₂) over the southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO₂) react significantly with both NO (high-NOₓ pathway) and HO₂ (low-NOₓ pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of total fine organic aerosol (OA) and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). Isoprene SOA production is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOₓ pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOₓ pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOₓ emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOₓ pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease more strongly as SO₂ emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) projects 2013–2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of 34 % for NOₓ (leading to a 7 % increase in isoprene SOA) and 48 % for SO₂ (35 % decrease in isoprene SOA). Reducing SO₂ emissions decreases sulfate and isoprene SOA by a similar magnitude, representing a factor of 2 co-benefit for PM₂.₅ from SO₂ emission controls.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to the entire NASA SEAC⁴RS team for their help in the field, in particular Paul Wennberg, John Crounse, Jason St. Clair, and Alex Teng for their CIT-CIMS measurements. Thanks also to Jesse Kroll for assisting in the interpretation of chamber study results. This work was funded by the NASA Tropospheric Chemistry Program, the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team, and a South African National Research Foundation Fellowship and Schlumberger Faculty for the Future Fellowship to E. A. Marais. W. Hu, J. Krechmer, P. Campuzano-Jost, D. A. Day, and J. L. Jimenez were supported by NASA NNX12AC03G/NNX15AT96G and NSF AGS-1243354. J. Krechmer was supported by EPA STAR (FP-91770901-0) and CIRES Fellowships. J. A. Fisher acknowledges support from a University of Wollongong Vice Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship. HCHO observations were acquired with support from NASA ROSES SEAC4RS grant NNH10ZDA001N. Although this document has been reviewed by US EPA and approved for publication, it does not necessarily reflect US EPA’s policies or views.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://acp.copernicus.org/articles/16/1603/2016/en_US
dc.format.extent16 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m20dih-jca9
dc.identifier.citationMarais, E. A., Jacob, D. J., Jimenez, J. L., Campuzano-Jost, P., Day, D. A., Hu, W., Krechmer, J., Zhu, L., Kim, P. S., Miller, C. C., Fisher, J. A., Travis, K., Yu, K., Hanisco, T. F., Wolfe, G. M., Arkinson, H. L., Pye, H. O. T., Froyd, K. D., Liao, J., and McNeill, V. F.: Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 1603–1618, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1603-2016 (2016), doi: https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1603-2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1603-2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/19654
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCopernicus Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Physics Department
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsPublic Domain Mark 1.0*
dc.rightsThis work was written as part of one of the author's official duties as an Employee of the United States Government and is therefore a work of the United States Government. In accordance with 17 U.S.C. 105, no copyright protection is available for such works under U.S. Law.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/*
dc.titleAqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controlsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
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