Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLane, Michael F.
dc.contributor.authorAravantinos, Vassilis L.
dc.contributor.authorHorsley, Timothy J.
dc.contributor.authorCharami, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T19:40:06Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T19:40:06Z
dc.description.abstractArchaeological Reconnaissance of Uninvestigated Remains of Agriculture (AROURA) consisted of field and laboratory research in the landscape around the Mycenaean (13th-century B.C.) fortress and storehouses of Gla in the Kopaic Basin, Boiotia, Greece. Central to fieldwork was the application of a topographical model of palace estates, based on the interpretation of Mycenaean landholding records. It was then possible to use geophysical technologies to detect the realities represented by the constituents of this model. The present article describes the archaeological and linguistic context of palace agriculture in which this model was developed. It then details the methodologies used, presents results, and draws conclusions about the trajectory of local social complexity compared with other parts of the Aegean.en_US
dc.description.sponsorship1. In addition to the archaeologists and support staff of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Boiotia, two prior Directors of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA), by which the official collaboration was vetted, Jack Davis and James Wright, deserve the greatest thanks. The Institute for Aegean Prehistory (INSTAP) sustained the project with generous financial and material support. Research would not have been completed on schedule without GIS Specialist Wes Bittner; Assistant Geophysical Specialist Allison Cuneo; and undergraduate trainees from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, the latter supervised by Giorgos Vavouranakis. Jost Knauss of the Technische Universität München cannot be praised enough for providing, in the spirit of academic altruism, copies of his fieldnotes and original plans and drawings. Finally, the authors thank the anonymous reviewers who provided invaluable substantive, critical, and structural comments.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2972/hesperia.89.3.0413?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contentsen_US
dc.format.extent62 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2hqzl-xcri
dc.identifier.citationMichael F. Lane, Vassilis L. Aravantinos, Timothy J. Horsley and Alexandra Charami, The AROURA Project: Discoveries in Central Greece, 2010–2014, Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens Vol. 89, No. 3 (July-September 2020), pp. 413-474, doi: 10.2972/hesperia.89.3.0413en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.2972/hesperia.89.3.0413
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/19994
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe American School of Classical Studies at Athensen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAthe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Ancient Studies Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.titleThe AROURA Project: Discoveries in Central Greece, 2010–2014en_US
dc.typeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record