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dc.contributor.authorFaust, Aiden
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T18:22:15Z
dc.date.available2015-09-29T18:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.description.abstractMy essay considers the question, “When did people of African descent in the New World begin to own personal copies of the Christian Bible?” This question focuses on the widespread distribution of Bibles by Evangelical Christians throughout the nineteenth century and considers the politics of African American access to information. The essay appears in the exhibition catalog for "Ashe to Amen: African Americans and Biblical Imagery,” which was exhibited at the Museum of Biblical Art, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, and the Dixon Gallery and Gardens 2013-2014.en_US
dc.genreen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2HS88
dc.identifier.citationFaust, Aiden. "Bible Politics: Denial, Division, & Exclusion in the 19th Century Religious Publishing Industry.” In Ashé to Amen: African Americans and Biblical Imagery, edited by Leslie King- Hammond, 13-18. New York: Museum of Biblical Art, 2013.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780977783991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/211
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMuseum of Biblical Arten_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectReligious publishing industry, African American history, American Bible Society, American Tract Societyen_US
dc.titleBible Politics: Denial, Division, & Exclusion in the 19th Century Religious Publishing Industryen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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