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dc.contributor.authorJorjani, Aimee K.
dc.contributor.programMA in Historic Preservationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T18:42:44Z
dc.date.available2016-04-11T18:42:44Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines two federal historic preservation grant programs administered by the National Park Service. Save America’s Treasures, funded between 1999 and 2010, supported the conservation and preservation of nationally significant historic structures and collections. Preserve America, funded between 2006 and 2010, supported communities committed to recognizing, designating, and protecting historic resources in order to find self-sustaining ways to utilize cultural resources through heritage tourism. My statement of hypothesis asks: Do federal historic preservation grants merit funding and can they be justified as a federal service? Does a federal investment in the two programs impact historic and cultural resources and yield net economic benefits? Finally, how can the preservation community better make the case for federal funding? This thesis is organized in four parts: (1) a policy argument for National Park Service leadership and involvement in external preservation programs; (2) analysis of federal spending and patterns; (3) goals fulfilled by the grant programs; and (4) ways to create a strong budget justification for the two grant programs. Research methods included examining and analyzing primary and secondary sources comprising in part federal budget documents, laws, interviews with preservation grants staff, and studies evaluating the value of cultural heritage. Through an independent study, I researched evaluation mechanisms that measure impacts and gauge program impacts. I found the two grant programs merit federal funds. My research uncovered trends that show they serve as a catalyst for local enthusiasm, education, economic development, private investment, prestige, and preservation. They assist the National Park Service in fulfilling their goals and mission as directed by statute. The budget justification eliminating the programs failed to consider the value received from every dollar invested through the programs. I also found purely basing economic impacts and budget planning takes away from the ultimate irreplaceable value at stake, and other potential unintended consequences. Ultimately, the fate highlights the importance of better understanding and articulating the programs’ net benefits and public purpose. Save America’s Treasures, Preserve America, federal preservation funding, evaluating federal preservation programsen_US
dc.format.extent208 p.en_US
dc.genrethesesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M28Q9S
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/2779
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtGoucher College, Baltimore, MD
dc.rightsTo view a complete copy of this thesis please contact Goucher College Special Collections & Archives at archives@goucher.edu or (410) 337-6075.
dc.subjectHistoric preservation -- United States -- Financeen_US
dc.subjectFederal aid -- Preservation -- United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshHistoric preservation -- Theses
dc.titleSeeking and Determining Impacts: Justifying Federal Competitive Historic Preservation Grant Programsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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