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dc.contributor.advisorReese, Margie
dc.contributor.authorWooden, Glenda Estelle
dc.contributor.programMA in Arts Administrationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-09T15:52:59Z
dc.date.available2016-08-09T15:52:59Z
dc.date.issued2016-06
dc.description.abstractTo elevate the diversity dialogue among students, the arts community, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), with the intent purpose to combat rhetoric that prolongs, or even proliferates the diversity gap, this paper explores what preemptive role HBCUs might play in proactively addressing the need to create a diverse pipeline to the field of arts administration. Through academic preparation, HBCUs can ensure African-American candidates acquire proficiencies to enter and make measurable gains in arts administration. The first argument asserts that arts organizations continue to postulate that the lack of African-American candidates in professional and leadership roles is inextricably related to the insufficient number of qualified and capable African-American candidates from which to recruit. The second argument asserts that arts organizations that have adopted satisfactory recruitment efforts, practices, and policies that value diversity yet remains homogenous reinforce assumptions that emerging African-American arts administrators are in short supply, lack interest in the field, or have inadequate formal arts education or experience. The third argument asserts that HBCUs, while limited in financial and physical resources, graduate an equal or greater amount of African-American students than predominantly white institutions (PWI). This implies that accompanying factors unique to the HBCU, such as early development of faculty and student relationships, alumni networks, extended family environment, and relevance to the African-American experience, are key to academic, social, and professional development. These findings suggest that unless reversed, the education gap will directly attribute to a greater underrepresentation of African-Americans in arts administration.en_US
dc.format.extent91 p.en_US
dc.genrethesesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2J79F
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/3104
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtGoucher College, Baltimore, MD
dc.rightsCollection may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectHistorically Black Colleges and Universitiesen_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectEquityen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectAffirmative Actionen_US
dc.subjectArts Managementen_US
dc.subjectQuantitative Diversityen_US
dc.subjectDiversity Goalsen_US
dc.subjectPipelineen_US
dc.subjectPartnershipen_US
dc.subjectArts and Culture Sectoren_US
dc.subjectArts Organizationsen_US
dc.subject.lcshArts administration -- Theses.
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Evaluation.
dc.subject.lcshArts administrators -- African American.
dc.titleQUANTIFIABLE DIVERSITY IN THE ARTS: HOW HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (HBCU) CAN INCREASE DIVERSITY IN ARTS ADMINISTRATIONen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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Collection may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Collection may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. To obtain information or permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Goucher Special Collections & Archives at 410-337-6347 or email archives@goucher.edu.