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dc.contributor.advisorHenderson, Lenneal J.
dc.contributor.authorEaton, Ivan P.
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Baltimore. Yale Gordon College of Public Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.programUniversity of Baltimore. Doctor of Public Administrationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-19T19:19:08Z
dc.date.available2016-12-19T19:19:08Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.descriptionD.P.A. -- University of Baltimoreen_US
dc.descriptionDissertation submitted to the Yale Gordon College of Public Affairs at the University of Baltimore in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Public Administration.en_US
dc.description.abstractOverview: Reportedly, the Black Community represents over 80% of all HIV/AIDS cases in the State of Maryland, now ranking first (1st) in the nation for Blacks/African Americans living with AIDS. This two-phased project presents a capacity building model to incite community and public administration practitioner involvement to collectively ensure the delivery of equitable, accountable, ethical, effective, efficient, high-quality, responsive, and sustainable HIV prevention and treatment programs while striving toward an idealistic, milestone target of cultural proficiency1 in order to achieve any resemblance of cultural competence. Method: Phase I, a participatory action research approach, describes preliminary issue formulation, formation of a community action movement to hold accountable stewards of public funds and development of a model to incite ethical and culturally proficient decision making in the public administration of HIV prevention and health services. Phase II, evolution of the model, provides scholarly inquiry through qualitative data analysis of archival documents to determine what the State did, is doing, or proposes to do, to remedy the spread of HIV/AIDS in Maryland and ensure for equitable and culturally proficient responses to HIV/AIDS in Maryland. Conclusion: Analysis of State archival documents on HIV prevention and health services does not evidence fulfillment of federally promulgated Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Standards (CLAS). The researcher recommends adoption of a capacity building model to garner support and provide direction toward cultural proficiency in the delivery of HIV prevention and health services.en_US
dc.format.extentviii, 250 leavesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.genredissertationsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M27Z40
dc.identifier.otherEaton_baltimore_0942A_10020
dc.identifier.otherUB_2011_Eaton_I
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/3715
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis item may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. It is made available by the University of Baltimore for non-commercial research and educational purposes.en_US
dc.subjectcultural competenceen_US
dc.subjectcultural proficiencyen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDS and African Americansen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDS and Blacksen_US
dc.subjectpublic administrationen_US
dc.subject.lcshAIDS (Disease)en_US
dc.subject.lcshAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subject.lcshDiseasesen_US
dc.subject.lcshHIV infectionsen_US
dc.subject.lcshMarylanden_US
dc.titleThe cultural proficiency capacity building model for organizational and systems accountabilityen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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