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dc.contributor.authorGibson, Ed
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-10T21:08:13Z
dc.date.available2017-04-10T21:08:13Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.description.abstractEmulation of the private sector is a longstanding controversy in public administration, but could it constitute a bad influence, of the kind that parents seek to guard against by scrutinizing their children's peers? Effectiveness provides a perspective on how helpful or harmful private sector influence has been for the public service. The practice of contracting-out under the A-76 process receives particular scrutiny relative to maintaining the effectiveness of public agencies. A second perspective on private sector influence examines, through the theoretical perspective of transaction-cost economics, the promise of cost savings that justified recent acceleration of contracting-out. The author, himself a government contractor, also bases his analysis on personal experience.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1081/PAD-120034074en_US
dc.format.extent10 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M24K14
dc.identifier.citationAdmitting a Bad Influence: Contracting the Public Service” (2004). In Charles Goodsell (symposium ed.), “Has PA Grown Up?” International Journal of Public Administration. 27(7): 481-490.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/3870
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectContracting out, Privatization, A-76, Baumol's disease, Transaction-cost economicsen_US
dc.titleAdmitting a Bad Influence: Contracting the Public Serviceen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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