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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Joshua C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-23T14:27:24Z
dc.date.available2017-10-23T14:27:24Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.description.abstractIn the summer of 1968, veteran members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) opened a shop in Washington, D.C., the Drum and Spear Bookstore, that specialized in the writings of people of African descent. In addition to its brick-and-mortar store, Drum and Spear ran a brisk mail-order distribution business for other black booksellers and, by 1969, even launched its own publishing company headquartered in Washington and Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. Drum and Spear was commercially ambitious, yet it was operated by a nonprofit organization, Afro-American Resources, Inc. “We don’t define profit in terms of money,” said SNCC activist and store cofounder Charlie Cobb. “The profit is the patronage of the community, which allows the store to self-support.”en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.aaihs.org/black-owned-bookstores-anchors-of-the-black-power-movement/en_US
dc.format.extent4 pagesen_US
dc.genreInternet articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2H98ZF39
dc.identifier.citationDavis, J. C. (2017). Black-Owned Bookstores: Anchors of the Black Power Movement. AAIHS, 1-4.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/7366
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAAIHSen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectblack activismen_US
dc.subjectblack-owned bookstoresen_US
dc.subjectblack power movementen_US
dc.subjectblack intellectual historyen_US
dc.subjectnationalismen_US
dc.subjectblack panther partyen_US
dc.subjectcivil rights movementen_US
dc.titleBlack-Owned Bookstores: Anchors of the Black Power Movementen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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