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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Joshua C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-25T17:13:38Z
dc.date.available2017-10-25T17:13:38Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.description.abstractOne night in the early 1970s, Donald Baker received a call for help from a listener. Baker was hosting his regular show on WAFR-FM in Durham, NC, a town of 100,000 residents with a declining tobacco and textile economy. The sole Black-owned radio station in Durham, WAFR occupied the second story of a former Masonic temple on Pettigrew Street in the heart of Hayti, the city’s historic Black business district. The caller was throwing a house party that night but didn’t have a record player. Baker—known on the air by his adopted Kiswahili name Mwanfunzi Shanga Sadiki—usually played a mix of jazz, Latin, and soul, but this night he tried something different.en_US
dc.format.extent11 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2319S414
dc.identifier.citationDavis, J. C. (2015). African Sounds in the American South: Community Radio, Historically Black Colleges, and Musical Pan‐Africanism. Journal of Popular Music Studies, 27(4), 437-447.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/7377
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Popular Music Studiesen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectafrican soundsen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Southen_US
dc.subjecthistorically black collegesen_US
dc.subjectmusical pan-africanismen_US
dc.subjectblack music historyen_US
dc.titleAfrican Sounds in the American South: Community Radio, Historically Black Colleges, and Musical Pan-Africanismen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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