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dc.contributor.advisorSpaid, Robin L.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Tiffany
dc.contributor.departmentHigher Education Program
dc.contributor.programPh.D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-27T15:56:30Z
dc.date.available2018-04-27T15:56:30Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this correlational study was to examine whether or not the four constructs (organizational change; technical expertise, support, and infrastructure; faculty compensation and time; and technology threats) are perceived to be barriers for HBIs faculty to teaching online courses. The researcher also investigated the faculty characteristics associated with the perceived barriers. The participants in this study were permanent, full-time faculty members from the four HBIs in Maryland. This quantitative study employed correlational methods to analyze data from a survey instrument derived from Berge's (1999) original research and modified to meet the needs of this study. The major findings of this study indicated that the biggest barrier by faculty was faculty compensation and time. The study found strong to minimal interrelationships among the four barrier constructs. A weak, though significant relationship was found between the barrier of technology threats and faculty age, and technology threats and faculty years of tenure. A weak inverse relationship found between organizational change and the number of courses faculty taught online as well as a weak inverse relationship with technical expertise, support, and infrastructure and the number of courses faculty taught online. Years of teaching experience was not related to the four barrier constructs. There was also a strong positive correlation found between faculty years of teaching experiences and tenure status. Only organizational change and technical expertise, support, and infrastructure were found to relate to online teaching (yes vs. no). Finally, the perceived barrier of technical expertise, support, and infrastructure was the only significant predictor of online teaching. Explicitly, for every one unit increase in perceived technical, expertise, support, and infrastructure the odds of not teaching an online course increases 1.72 times. The results presented in this study have contributed new information to the educational literature about the barriers HBI faculty members have in relation to teaching online.
dc.genredissertations
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M23775Z27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/10595
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMorgan State University
dc.rightsThis item is made available by Morgan State University for personal, educational, and research purposes in accordance with Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Other uses may require permission from the copyright owner.
dc.subjectHigher Education
dc.subjectHigher Education Administration
dc.subjectOnline Education
dc.subjectDistance Education
dc.subjectHbi Faculty Perceptions Of Barriers To Online Teaching In Maryland
dc.subjectFaculty Perceptions
dc.subjectBarriers To Online Teaching
dc.subjectHistorically Black Colleges And Universities
dc.titleHbi Faculty Perceptions Of Barriers To Online Teaching In Maryland
dc.typeText


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