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dc.contributor.advisorGillett-Karam, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorBudd, Lorrie
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Studies, Leadership, and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.programDoctor of Educationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-27T16:12:17Z
dc.date.available2018-04-27T16:12:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether first-year community college student retention rates varied with student age and learning community enrollment status at a mid-Atlantic, suburban community college. In particular, the researcher considered how first-year retention rates may differ between adult community college students (age 25 years and older) and traditional community college students (ages 18 to 24 years old). Kuh's (2008) high-impact practices model served as the theoretical framework for this study. The independent variables were student age and learning community enrollment status. The dependent variable was first-year retention rates. First-year fall-to-spring semester retention data and fall-to-fall academic year retention data for community college student cohorts were collected from enrollment records from 2010 through 2016. From six years of data, 63 students were first-time adult students in learning communities. This sample set the standard for the comparison groups; thus, four groups of 63 first-time students were selected: 63 adult learning community students [25 years and older], 63 adult non-learning community students [25 years and older], 63 traditional-aged learning community students [18 to 24 years old], and 63 traditional-aged non-learning community students [18 to 24 years old]. Three research questions guided this dissertation study to determine how first-year community college student retention rates were affected by student age, learning community enrollment status, and the interaction between student age and learning community enrollment status. The ex post facto institutional data were analyzed at an alpha significance level of 0.05 through t-tests and ANOVA procedures. The results of the study showed no statistically significant difference in fall-to-spring and fall-to-fall first-year retention rates for adult and traditional community college students. Except for the 2011 fall-to-spring semester retention, the results also showed no statistically significant difference in fall-to-spring retention rates for first-time community college students enrolled in learning communities and those not so enrolled. However, for 2011, 2012, and all the years combined, there was a statistically significant difference in fall-to-fall retention rates for first-time community college students enrolled in learning communities and those not so enrolled. Except for the fall-to-spring semester retention for 2011 when the results showed a main effect for learning community status, the ANOVA tests for fall-to-spring retention rates showed no main effect for student age, no main effect for learning community status, and no interaction between student age and learning community status. Except for the fall-to-fall yearly retention for 2011 and all the years combined when the results showed a main effect for learning community status, the ANOVA tests for fall-to-fall retention rates showed no main effect for student age, no main effect for learning community status, and no interaction between student age and learning community status. This study contributes to the literature on community college student retention strategies based on student engagement theory. Recommendations for professional consideration, professional practice, and further research are included.
dc.genredissertations
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M24M91D47
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/10703
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMorgan State University
dc.rightsThis item is made available by Morgan State University for personal, educational, and research purposes in accordance with Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Other uses may require permission from the copyright owner.
dc.subjectAdult educationen_US
dc.titleThe Differences In First-Year Retention Rates For Adult And Traditional Community College Students Enrolled And Not Enrolled In Learning Communities
dc.typeText


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