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dc.contributor.authorSchultz, David
dc.contributor.authorPindar, Wendy M.
dc.contributor.authorWiprovnick, Alicia E.
dc.contributor.authorGroth, Elizabeth C.
dc.contributor.authorShanty, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Anne
dc.contributor.authorJones, Shelby S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T13:09:32Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T13:09:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-23
dc.description.abstractPurpose Home visiting programs have produced inconsistent outcomes. One challenge for the field is the design and implementation of effective training to support home visiting staff. In part due to a lack of formal training, most home visitors need to develop the majority of their skills on the job. Home visitors typically receive training in their agency’s specific model (e.g., HFA, NFP) and, if applicable, curriculum. Increasingly, states and other home visiting systems are developing and/or coordinating more extensive training and support systems beyond model-specific and curricula trainings. To help guide these training efforts and future evaluations of them, this paper reviews research on effective training, particularly principles of training transfer and adult learning. Description Our review summarizes several meta-analyses, reviews, and more recent publications on training transfer and adult learning principles. Assessment Effective training involves not only the introduction and modeling of concepts and skills but also the practice of, evaluation of, and reflection upon these skills. Further, ongoing encouragement of, reward for, and reflection upon use of these skills, particularly by a home visitor’s supervisor, are critical for the home visitor’s continued use of these skills with families. Conclusion Application of principles of adult learning and training transfer to home visiting training will likely lead to greater transfer of skills from the training environment to work with families. The involvement of both home visitors and their supervisors in training is likely important for this transfer to occur.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-018-2554-6#citeasen_US
dc.format.extent11 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles postprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M29Z90G0S
dc.identifier.citationSchultz, D., Jones, S.S., Pinder, W.M. et al. Matern Child Health J (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-018-2554-6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-018-2554-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/11025
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Psychology Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.rightsThis item may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. It is made available by UMBC for non-commercial research and education. For permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the author.
dc.subjecthome visitingen_US
dc.subjecttrainingen_US
dc.subjectadult learning principlesen_US
dc.subjecttraining transferen_US
dc.titleEffective Home Visiting Training: Key Principles and Findings to Guide Training Developers and Evaluatorsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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