Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStanley, Calandra Q.
dc.contributor.authorMcKinnon, Emily A.
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Kevin C.
dc.contributor.authorMacpherson, Maggie P.
dc.contributor.authorCasbourn, Garth
dc.contributor.authorFriesen, Lyle
dc.contributor.authorMarra, Peter P.
dc.contributor.authorStudds, Colin
dc.contributor.authorRyder, T. Brandt
dc.contributor.authorDiggs, Nora E.
dc.contributor.authorStutchbury, Bridget J. M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T15:34:38Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T15:34:38Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-22
dc.description.abstractMany migratory animals are experiencing rapid population declines, but migration data withthe geographic scope and resolution to quantify the complex network of movements between breedingand nonbreeding regions are often lacking. Determining the most frequently used migration routes andnonbreeding regions for a species is critical for understanding population dynamics and making effectiveconservation decisions. We tracked the migration of individual Wood Thrushes(Hylocichla mustelina)(n=102) from across their range with light-level geolocators and, for the first time, quantified migration routesand wintering regions for distinct breeding populations. We identified regional and species-level migratoryconnectivity networks for this declining songbird by combining our tracking results with range-wide breedingabundance estimates and forest cover data. More than 50% of the species occupied the eastern winteringrange (Honduras to Costa Rica), a region that includes only one-third of all wintering habitat and that isundergoing intensive deforestation. We estimated that half of all Wood Thrushes in North America migratesouth through Florida in fall, whereas in spring approximately 73% funnel northward through a narrow spanalong the central U.S. Gulf Coast (88–93°W). Identifying migratory networks is a critical step for conservationof songbirds and we demonstrated with Wood Thrushes how it can highlight conservation hotspots for regionalpopulations and species as a wholeen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank J. Sauer for analysis of Breeding Bird Survey dataand S. Barretto for GIS analysis. We thank the followingfunding sources: Natural Sciences and Engineering Re-search Council of Canada, National Geographic Society,U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Neotropical Migratory BirdGrant, Environment Canada, Schad Foundation, KennethM. Molson Foundation, York University, and proceedsfromSilence of the Songbirds(Walker & Co.). P.P.M.,T.B.R., and C.E.S. received support from the Departmentof Defence’s Legacy Program and the Strategic Environ-mental Research Development Program. The NationalAudubon Society provided funding and Pro-Aves Ver-acruz provided assistance for fieldwork in Mexico. Tropi-cal fieldwork was conducted at the Belize Foundation forResearch and Environmental Education, La Selva in CostaRica, and Reserva Nebliselva El Jaguar in Nicaragua. Wethank J. Marlin, J. Rotenberg, L. Duriaux-Chavarria, andG. Duriaux for field support in Central America.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/cobi.12352en_US
dc.format.extent11 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2hnqq-cpux
dc.identifier.citationCalandra Q. Stanley Emily A. McKinnon ,et.al, Connectivity of wood thrush breeding, wintering, and migration sites based on range‐wide tracking, Conservation Biology, Volume 29, No. 1, 164–174, 2014, DOI: 10.1111/cobi.12352en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12352
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/13009
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Conservation Biologyen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Geography and Environmental Systems Department
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsThis work was written as part of one of the author's official duties as an Employee of the United States Government and is therefore a work of the United States Government. In accordance with 17 U.S.C. 105, no copyright protection is available for such works under U.S. Law.*
dc.rightsPublic Domain Mark 1.0
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/*
dc.subjectCentral Americaen_US
dc.subjectgeolocatoren_US
dc.subjectHylocichla mustelinaen_US
dc.subjectmigration networken_US
dc.subjectmigration routeen_US
dc.subjectmigratory connectivityen_US
dc.subjecttropical deforestationen_US
dc.titleConnectivity of wood thrush breeding, wintering, andmigration sites based on range-wide trackingen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.