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dc.contributor.authorBaker, M. E.
dc.contributor.authorSchley, M. L.
dc.contributor.authorSexton, J. O.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T14:31:37Z
dc.date.available2019-10-09T14:31:37Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-05
dc.description.abstractLong‐term analysis indicates that progressive salinization of freshwaters is widespread. Although increases are often associated with urbanization, knowledge of chemical dynamics during urbanization is limited and typically drawn from space‐for‐time studies. Thus, the potential role of stream chemistry in sharp biodiversity losses observed at low levels of urbanization is difficult to distinguish from other concurrent factors such as temperature, flow, or sediment. We used a 25‐year annual time series of impervious cover for the Baltimore‐Washington, DC, metropolitan area to interpret long‐term records from 12 watershed‐monitoring stations in the Mid‐Atlantic Piedmont USA from 1986 to 2010 and explore stream conductivity under progressive urbanization. All 12 watersheds experienced variable but monotonic increases in impervious cover, which ranged from <1% to nearly 25% of contributing area. All monitoring stations exhibited elevated specific conductance relative to background concentrations. Proliferation of impervious cover led to seasonal shifts in monthly conductivity maxima, with progressive dominance of winter pulses and diminishing signal from evapotranspirative concentration in late summer. We found consistently steep increases in stream conductivity across years and seasons associated with incremental increases in low (0‐4.5%) levels of watershed impervious cover; moderate to low rates of increase, but distinct seasonal concentrations from 4.5 to 13.8% impervious cover; and increasing predominance of pulses at high levels of impervious cover (>13.8%), particularly when conditioned on winter storm events. Observed patterns may suggest distinct sources and different degrees of hydrologic connection. Despite ubiquitous increases, variability in conductivity trends across space and time underscores the need for more intensive monitoring as urbanization progresses.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe manuscript was written through contributions and approval of all authors. M. Baker and J. Sexton received support from Maryland Sea Grant R/UC‐1 under award NA10OAR4170072 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.en_US
dc.format.extent17 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2qxc8-9isn
dc.identifier.citationBaker, M. E., Schley, M. L., & Sexton, J.O. (2019). Impacts of expandingimpervious surface on specificconductance in urbanizing streams.Water Resources Research,55,6482–6498. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019WR025014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2019WR025014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/14994
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Geography and Environmental Systems Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsAccess to this item will begin on 2020-01-24
dc.rights©2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.subjecturbanizationen_US
dc.subjectspecific conductivityen_US
dc.subjectwater qualityen_US
dc.subjectremote sensingen_US
dc.subjecttime seriesen_US
dc.subjectwatershedsen_US
dc.titleImpacts of Expanding Impervious Surface on SpecificConductance in Urbanizing Streamsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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