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dc.contributor.authorBrainard, Lori
dc.contributor.authorEdlins, Mariglynn
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T18:27:58Z
dc.date.available2015-09-18T18:27:58Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.description.abstractSocial media technologies present a new way for government agencies to connect with, and potentially collaborate with, their residents. Police departments (PDs) are a setting ripe for use of social media as an extension of their community policing efforts. In this article, we explore the use of social media by PDs in the top 10 most populous U.S. cities. We analyze police-initiated posts on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube over a 3-month period to determine what accounts PDs use, if they use social media for information transmission or interaction, and if they use the accounts for dialogue that might make collaboration possible. We find that while PDs have and use social media, and while citizens are responsive, there is much less interaction in part due to nonresponsiveness of PDs themselves. We thus conclude that though the existence of some PD-resident dialogue is promising, very little was collaborative.en_US
dc.genreen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M23P9W
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/195
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Review of Public Administrationen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Baltimore
dc.subjectcommunity policingen_US
dc.subjectsocial media
dc.subjectcivic engagement
dc.titleTop 10 U.S. Municipal Police Departments and Their Social Media Usageen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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