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dc.contributor.authorSherman, Alan T.
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Geoffrey L.
dc.contributor.authorOliva, Linda
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Peter A. H.
dc.contributor.authorGolaszewski, Enis
dc.contributor.authorPoulsen, Seth
dc.contributor.authorScheponik, Travis
dc.contributor.authorGorti, Akshita
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T16:20:55Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T16:20:55Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-09
dc.description.abstractWe reflect on our ongoing journey in the educational Cybersecurity Assessment Tools (CATS) Project to create two concept inventories for cybersecurity. We identify key steps in this journey and important questions we faced. We explain the decisions we made and discuss the consequences of those decisions, highlighting what worked well and what might have gone better. The CATS Project is creating and validating two concept inventories—conceptual tests of understanding—that can be used to measure the effectiveness of various approaches to teaching and learning cybersecurity. The Cybersecurity Concept Inventory (CCI) is for students who have recently completed any first course in cybersecurity; the Cybersecurity Curriculum Assessment (CCA) is for students who have recently completed an undergraduate major or track in cybersecurity. Each assessment tool comprises 25 multiple-choice questions (MCQs) of various difficulties that target the same five core concepts, but the CCA assumes greater technical background. Key steps include defining project scope, identifying the core concepts, uncovering student misconceptions, creating scenarios, drafting question stems, developing distractor answer choices, generating educational materials, performing expert reviews, recruiting student subjects, organizing workshops, building community acceptance, forming a team and nurturing collaboration, adopting tools, and obtaining and using funding. Creating effective MCQs is difficult and time-consuming, and cybersecurity presents special challenges. Because cybersecurity issues are often subtle, where the adversarial model and details matter greatly, it is challenging to construct MCQs for which there is exactly one best but non-obvious answer. We hope that our experiences and lessons learned may help others create more effective concept inventories and assessments in STEM.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the many people who contributed to the CATS project as Delphi experts, interview subjects, Hackathon participants, expert reviewers, student subjects, and former team members, including Michael Neary, Spencer Offenberger, Geet Parekh, Konstantinos Patsourakos, Dhananjay Phatak, and Julia Thompson. Support for this research was provided in part by the U.S. Department of Defense under CAE-R grants H98230-15-1-0294, H98230-15-1-0273, H98230-17-1-0349, H98230-17-1-0347; and by the National Science Foundation under UMBC SFS grants DGE-1241576, 1753681, and SFS Capacity Grants DGE-1819521, 1820531.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-58703-1_1en_US
dc.format.extent25 pagesen_US
dc.genrebook chapters preprintsen_US
dc.genreconference papers and proceedings
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2vkl6-okyy
dc.identifier.citationSherman A.T. et al. (2021) Experiences and Lessons Learned Creating and Validating Concept Inventories for Cybersecurity. In: Choo KK.R., Morris T., Peterson G.L., Imsand E. (eds) National Cyber Summit (NCS) Research Track 2020. NCS 2020. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol 1271. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-58703-1_1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-58703-1_1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/19999
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Education Department
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.titleExperiences and Lessons Learned Creating and Validating Concept Inventories for Cybersecurityen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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