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dcterms.accessRightsThis item may be protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. It is made available by UMBC for non-commercial research and education. For permission to publish or reproduce, please see http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/specoll/repro.php or contact Special Collections at speccoll(at)umbc.edu
dc.contributor.advisorCheah, Charissa S. L. ;
dc.contributor.departmentPsychology
dc.contributor.programPsychology
dc.creatorSeo, You Jung
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-01T13:55:26Z
dc.date.available2021-09-01T13:55:26Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-20
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation project aimed to clarify pathways toward young Korean immigrant children?s socioemotional and behavioral adjustment by exploring associations among predictors of parenting, parenting behaviors and practices, and child adjustment outcomes using a multi-method approach across three separate empirical papers. The first paper with 158 Korean immigrant mothers examined the contributions of social support and found that greater perceived instrumental support (but not emotional support) received from kin predicted better maternal psychological well-being 6 months later, which in turn predicted less reported authoritarian parenting style 6 months later. The second paper examined associations among 120 Korean immigrant mothers? observed use of praise and encouragement, their acculturation, their children?s socioemotional and behavioral difficulties and the moderating role of child gender and age. Mothers used process praise most frequently. Higher levels of American acculturation were associated with more use of person and other praise. Higher levels of maintenance of their heritage Korean culture were associated with mothers? greater use of person praise among younger children, but less use of person praise among older children. Mothers with higher levels of American acculturation with older children only used more encouragement. Maternal encouragement was associated with fewer child difficulties. The third paper examined the transactional associations among maternal warmth, child temperamental inhibitory control, child externalizing behaviors, and maternal American acculturation in Korean immigrant families with young children across three time points, each 6-months apart. Korean immigrant mothers and their preschool-aged children in the U.S. participated (n = 199 at Wave 1, n = 138 at Wave 2, and n = 105 at Wave 3). Moderate to strong stabilities within each construct across time and within-time covariations among the constructs were revealed. Transactional relations between parent and child were not found. However, Wave 2 maternal warmth predicted increases in Wave 3 child temperamental inhibitory control. Wave 1 maternal American acculturation significantly influenced their level of Wave 2 maternal warmth. Overall, this dissertation project extended our current understanding of contributors to, and outcomes associated with, Korean immigrant parenting and informed the development of culturally sensitive parenting programs to facilitate Korean immigrant children?s positive adjustment in the U.S.
dc.formatapplication:pdf
dc.genredissertation
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m28t1p-b0bo
dc.identifier.other12128
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/22838
dc.languageen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Psychology Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Theses and Dissertations Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Graduate School Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.sourceOriginal File Name: Seo_umbc_0434D_12128.pdf
dc.titleA MULTI-METHOD EXPLORATION OF KOREAN IMMIGRANT PARENTING AND CHILDREN?S SOCIO-EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL OUTCOMES IN THE U.S.
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