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dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyang-Sook
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, Donna
dc.contributor.authorAlmutairi, Talal M.
dc.contributor.departmentTowson University. Department of Mass Communicationen_US
dcterms.creatorhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5650-5505en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-01T18:42:15Z
dc.date.available2022-04-01T18:42:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-30
dc.description.abstractBackground: Fear appeals are commonly used in health communication to reduce risk. It is not clear, however, whether familiarity with a health topic can lessen the threat intended. The use of unregulated dietary supplements among young adults is one such area that needs study. Purpose: The study examined the effect of fear appeals on self-protective behavior when college students were informed of the risks of consuming the dietary supplement creatine. It focused on students’ responses to fear appeals that varied depending on their familiarity with the product. Methods: Students were assigned to one of 3 groups based on familiarity with creatine. A total of 121 college students viewed advertisements depicting creatine consumption side effects, followed by the main questionnaire including perceived risk, attitudes, and behavioral intention measures. Results: Fear appeal messages were most effective for those least familiar with creatine. Discussion: Familiarity based on previous experience is a factor that must be considered when presenting threatening health information. Translation to Health Education Practice: Health educators and practitioners should inform young adults about risks and proper consumption of dietary supplements before they develop a strong disposition toward the product without accurate knowledge of proper dose and potential side effects.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/19325037.2014.932726en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.format.extent11 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articlesen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2bhi3-1lzc
dc.identifier.citationKim, H-S., Sheffield, D., & Almutairi, T. (2014). Effects of fear appeals on communicating potential health risks of unregulated dietary supplements to college students. American Journal of Health Education, 45 (5), 308-315. https://doi.org/10.1080/19325037.2014.932726en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-5037
dc.identifier.issn2168-3751
dc.identifier.uri10.1080/19325037.2014.932726
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/24475
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtTowson University
dc.relation.isAvailableAtTowson University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAmerican Journal of Health Education;volume 45, issue 5
dc.subjectCollege students -- Drug useen_US
dc.subjectDietary supplementsen_US
dc.subjectFearen_US
dc.subjectHealth educationen_US
dc.titleEffects of fear appeals on communicating potential health risks of unregulated dietary supplements to college studentsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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