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dc.contributor.advisorMcKay, Sylvester E.
dc.contributor.authorGoodlowe-Scott, Quinhon N.
dc.contributor.departmentEducation and Urban Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.programDoctor of Educationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-27T15:07:33Z
dc.date.available2018-04-27T15:07:33Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.description.abstractIn high schools across the country, college readiness standards have emerged as an important post-secondary educational outcome. Previous reform efforts have largely focused on “failing schools” versus “failing students” (Weissberg, 2010). This study takes the view that student learning habits might be better determinants of college readiness than previous educational practices have considered. Using the 1992 National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS:88/92), this study analyzed the nine student learning habits that social scientists have discussed as key factors for achieving positive post-secondary educational outcomes. The student learning habits under consideration in this study were: (a) work handed in on time, (b) less absenteeism, (c) taking harder courses, (d) diligence, (e) work habits (time spent on mathematics homework, science homework, English homework, social studies/history homework, and total homework), (f) paying attention in class, (g) participating in class, (h) doing more than what is expected, and (i) preparation for class (Jeynes, 2003). The quantitative research design explored the relationship among nine students learning habits and sought to determine if there is a predictive relationship between student learning habits and post-secondary educational outcomes of public high school students. This study also examined which combination of the student learning habits was the best predictor of post-secondary educational outcomes. Post-secondary educational outcomes were measured on a continuum: (a) did not complete high school, (b) no post-secondary education, (c) no degree, currently working on certification or license, (d) no degree currently working on Associates Degree, (e) no degree currently working on Bachelors Degree, (f) some post-secondary education, other, (g) certificate or license, and (h) Associates Degree. The findings concluded that there is a relationship between the nine student learning habits and post-secondary educational outcomes. Of the nine student learning habits explored, the findings indicated that less absenteeism, taking harder courses, and time spent on completing mathematics homework (work habits) were the most significant predictors of students' post-secondary educational outcomes.
dc.genredissertations
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2GQ6R49R
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/9965
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMorgan State University
dc.rightsThis item is made available by Morgan State University for personal, educational, and research purposes in accordance with Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Other uses may require permission from the copyright owner.
dc.subjectUniversities and collegesen_US
dc.subjectMathematicsen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondaryen_US
dc.titleExamining The Relationship Between Student Learning Habits And Post-Secondary Educational Outcomes: The Missing Component
dc.typeText


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