Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIbsen, Peter C.
dc.contributor.authorBorowy, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorDell, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorGreydanus, Hattie
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Neha
dc.contributor.authorHondula, David M.
dc.contributor.authorMeixner, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorSantelmann, Mary V.
dc.contributor.authorShiflett, Sheri A.
dc.contributor.authorSukop, Michael C.
dc.contributor.authorSwan, Christopher M.
dc.contributor.authorTalal, Michelle L.
dc.contributor.authorValencia, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorWright, Mary K.
dc.contributor.authorJenerette, G. Darrel
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T19:09:31Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T19:09:31Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-15
dc.description.abstractHigh nighttime urban air temperatures increase health risks and economic vulnerability of people globally. While recent studies have highlighted nighttime heat mitigation effects of urban vegetation, the magnitude and variability of vegetation-derived urban nighttime cooling differs greatly among cities. We hypothesize that urban vegetation-derived nighttime air cooling is driven by vegetation density whose effect is regulated by aridity through increasing transpiration. We test this hypothesis by deploying microclimate sensors across eight United States cities and investigating relationships of nighttime air temperature and urban vegetation throughout a summer season. Urban vegetation decreased nighttime air temperature in all cities. Vegetation cooling magnitudes increased as a function of aridity, resulting in the lowest cooling magnitude of 1.4 °C in the most humid city, Miami, FL, and 5.6 °C in the most arid city, Las Vegas, NV. Consistent with the differences among cities, the cooling effect increased during heat waves in all cities. For cities that experience a summer monsoon, Phoenix and Tucson, AZ, the cooling magnitude was larger during the more arid pre-monsoon season than during the more humid monsoon period. Our results place the large differences among previous measurements of vegetation nighttime urban cooling into a coherent physiological framework dependent on plant transpiration. This work informs urban heat risk planning by providing a framework for using urban vegetation as an environmental justice tool and can help identify where and when urban vegetation has the largest effect on mitigating nighttime temperatures.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe greatly appreciate the logistical and organizational support from the Urban Water Innovation Network, especially including Mazdak Arabi and Sarah Millonig. We thank Dion Kucera, Julie Ripplinger, Holly Andrews, Mia Rochford, Samuel Meltzer, Ariane Middel, Ales Urban, Erin Everton, and Tess Gallagher for field assistance. We thank Steven Crum for helpful comments on the development of the analysis, and Janet Franklin and Louis Santiago for comments on an earlier draft of this paper. We acknowledge funding from the US National Science Foundation (CBET1444758 and CNH-1924288).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/abdf8aen_US
dc.format.extent12 pagesen_US
dc.genrejournal articles postprintsen_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/m2ejgr-2wod
dc.identifier.citationIbsen, Peter C.; Borowy, Dorothy; Dell, Tyler; Greydanus, Hattie; Gupta, Neha; Hondula, David M.; Meixner, Thomas; Santelmann, Mary V.; Shiflett, Sheri A.; Sukop, Michael C.; Swan, Christopher M.; Talal, Michelle L.; Valencia, Miguel; Wright, Mary K.; Jenerette, G. Darrel; Greater aridity increases the magnitude of urban nighttime vegetation-derived air cooling; Environmental Research Letters, Volume 16, Number 3 (2021); https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/abdf8aen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/abdf8a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11603/21051
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIOP Publishingen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtThe University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Geography and Environmental Systems Department Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Faculty Collection
dc.relation.ispartofUMBC Student Collection
dc.rightsThis item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/*
dc.titleGreater aridity increases the magnitude of urban nighttime vegetation-derived air coolingen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This item is likely protected under Title 17 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Unless on a Creative Commons license, for uses protected by Copyright Law, contact the copyright holder or the author.